Codified DAM Consultant

Step 1: Gap Analysis

Step 1: Gap Analysis

Gap Analysis (what you don’t have) - Identifying ‘gaps’ in the business and making a plan for what you hope to achieve by carrying out the desired project

Even before a business case has been established, an individual may realise the need for DAM within the organisation. Conversely, it may also be that a business case is not developed and a DAM project is rushed into, before checking what other solutions there are to a certain problem. DAM can be the solution to many problems in an organisation which has issues with data management, but it is not the solution to everything and this is one of the reasons why a business plan for DAM is important.

Another reason is that a business plan will form the basis of an effective DAM strategy by highlighting the specific outcomes of implementation, which parties will benefit most and what will be required of the DAM itself when it comes to procurement further down the line. Perhaps the most important reason why a plan is important is that it is likely to give an idea of costs and return on investment (ROI). These, in turn, will inform issues such as budget, timescale, change management and thus feasibility.

A successful business case will be gleaned from research carried out within an organisation and within the DAM industry itself. It must be realistic but ambitious and must result in a unified, business-wide vision of the DAM implementation. To produce a business plan you need to know where costs and resources will be saved as a consequence of implementation and perhaps even a rough idea of by how much. A business plan must be adaptable, requirements can change over time and so there must be room to move and change the plan when necessary.

The plan must be comprehensive, taking into account all relevant parties, addressing all relevant problems and always keeping the overall ROI to the business at the core. Whilst covering all the bases, the business plan is often presented to a number of different parties so must be put forward in a concise and understandable manner, so that key features can be demonstrated clearly. It is via these methods that a business plan will allow others to see the potential benefits of DAM, indeed it is often the case that individuals will require a lot of convincing.

Step 1: Gap Analysis

Gap Analysis (what you don’t have) - Identifying ‘gaps’ in the business and making a plan for what you hope to achieve by carrying out the desired project

Digital Asset Management Gap Analysis - People

The Codified Consultant gap analysis serves as a means by which companies are able to assess their level of expertise in different aspects of DAM operation. The model is based on five competency levels, placing proficiency in a certain area in increasing categories of sophistication/functionality. The five levels on this scale are as follows:

  • Ad Hoc - Some exposure to DAM.
  • Incipient - A “casual understanding”.
  • Formative - Demonstrated experience of DAM.
  • Operational - In-depth knowledge of DAM operation, but abilities not yet optimal.
  • Optimal - Effective, demonstrable experience in DAM operations and consequently have optimal abilities in all the above five areas.

The five-point system is used to describe proficiency in four parent categories, which are further subdivided into a total of fifteen dimensions. The parent categories reflect the four aspects of DAM which most inform its success as a management system; people, information, systems and processes. The categorisation can be a useful tool in allowing a company to make their own assessments of, and pinpoint where they might be lacking in terms of infrastructure, functionality, management and expertise. This information can then be used to direct a digital transformation, establish a roadmap for development, denote which software to implement and in time improve their overall abilities in DAM and the wider digital sphere.

People

Stakeholders

Operational - In-depth knowledge of DAM operation, but abilities not yet optimal. Optimal - Effective, demonstrable experience in DAM operations and consequently have optimal abilities in all the above five areas.

 Gap Analysis Identifies Stakeholders

First Adopters

Formative - Demonstrated experience of DAM. Operational - In-depth knowledge of DAM operation, but abilities not yet optimal.

Gap Analysis identifies first adoptersChange Management and or Training Needs


Ad Hoc - Some exposure to DAM usually means training is needed

Incipient - A “casual understanding”, usually means training is needed or change management needs to e put into effect.

Change Management and or Training Needs

Information

Gap Analysis InformationSystems

Digital Asset Management Gap Analysis SystemsProcesses

Digital Asset Management Gap Analysis Processes

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